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Franciscan Media Books
an imprint of Franciscan Media


Should Franciscan Media Publish Your Book?

Our Mission

Franciscan Media seeks to spread the Word that is Jesus Christ in the style of Sts. Francis, Clare, and Anthony. Through print and electronic media marketed in North America and worldwide, we endeavor to evangelize, inspire, and inform those who search for God and seek a richer Catholic, Christian, human life. Our efforts help support the life, ministry, and charities of the Franciscan Friars of St. John the Baptist Province, who sponsor our work.

What We Seek to Publish

Franciscan Media Books seeks manuscripts that inform and inspire adult Catholics, other Christians and all who are seeking to better understand and live their faith . We publish for those who want to connect to the world around them in the context of their faith and their spiritual journey. Our goal is to help people "Live in love. Grow in faith."

We look for writing that speaks to a popular audience and is not academic or scholarly in tone. Writing should be easy to read, practical, concrete, and may include relatable examples and stories. Our books strive to support the spread of the Gospel in the spirit of St. Francis, without being moralistic or overly reliant on jargon, but by reaching out and touching the heart.

We publish a total of 20 to 30 trade non-fiction and fiction books per year.

What We Do Not Publish

We do not publish poetry; collections of homilies or essays or columns; academic studies; art books; or encyclopedias.

Our Market: Who Buys Our Books

The people who buy our trade books are Catholics, other Christians and seekers/searchers who value the breadth and intellectually stimulating message rooted in the Gospel of Jesus Christ and, in a general sense, reflect the spirit of St. Francis, a spirit of inclusion, of respect for all faiths and traditions, of respect for the created order.

How to Submit Your Book Proposal

When you are ready to submit a complete book proposal, you can submit it by e-mail (preferred) or by postal delivery:

E-mail to MLombard@FranciscanMedia.org

Postal delivery to:

Mark Lombard
Director, Book Publishing Division and Foreign Rights
Franciscan Media
28 W. Liberty St.
Cincinnati, OH 45202

Your book proposal should include:
  • A cover letter that tells us what you are proposing—the subject of the book, its approximate word count, the intended audience, what makes your idea distinct from similar books on the market, a summary of competitive books.
  • A table of contents.
  • A detailed outline or synopsis of the book, chapter by chapter.
  • A sample chapter and the introduction.
  • A résumé, curriculum vitae, or brief biographical information pertinent to your writing, publishing, or speaking endeavors.
  • A description of your platform (other books published and information about their sales, speaking engagements, social media presene, blog, and other writing outlets).
  • Any endorsements for your book or proposal you have secured or expect to be able to secure.
  • Your ideas for promotion and marketing of the book and how you will be an active publishing partner in marketing your book.
  • Your Address, e-mail, and telephone number.
Upon receipt of your proposal, we will send you a response within 60 days for proposals sent by e-mail, 90 days for those sent by postal delivery.

We do not accept proposals submitted to another publisher at the same time.

We prefer proposals that have not been submitted to another publisher at the same time.

We do not accept responsibility for lost manuscripts or unsolicited material, and do not return unsolicited manuscripts or books.

Thank you for your interest in Franciscan Media Books and Franciscan Media.

Rev. 6/15





Our Lady of Lourdes: On December 8, 1854, Pope Pius IX proclaimed the dogma of the Immaculate Conception in the apostolic constitution <i>Ineffabilis Deus</i>. A little more than three years later, on February 11, 1858, a young lady appeared to Bernadette Soubirous. This began a series of visions. During the apparition on March 25, the lady identified herself with the words: “I am the Immaculate Conception.” 
<p>Bernadette was a sickly child of poor parents. Their practice of the Catholic faith was scarcely more than lukewarm. Bernadette could pray the Our Father, the Hail Mary and the Creed. She also knew the prayer of the Miraculous Medal: “O Mary conceived without sin.” </p><p>During interrogations Bernadette gave an account of what she saw. It was “something white in the shape of a girl.” She used the word <i>aquero</i>, a dialect term meaning “this thing.” It was “a pretty young girl with a rosary over her arm.” Her white robe was encircled by a blue girdle. She wore a white veil. There was a yellow rose on each foot. A rosary was in her hand. Bernadette was also impressed by the fact that the lady did not use the informal form of address (<i>tu</i>), but the polite form (<i>vous</i>). The humble virgin appeared to a humble girl and treated her with dignity. </p><p>Through that humble girl, Mary revitalized and continues to revitalize the faith of millions of people. People began to flock to Lourdes from other parts of France and from all over the world. In 1862 Church authorities confirmed the authenticity of the apparitions and authorized the cult of Our Lady of Lourdes for the diocese. The Feast of Our Lady of Lourdes became worldwide in 1907.</p> American Catholic Blog While the term social justice has received negative connotations in some circles in recent years due to certain media misrepresentations of the tradition, the vocation of all Christian women and men to work toward the common good, protect the dignity of all human life, strive toward ending violence in all forms, and providing for the welfare of all people remains integral to who we are as bearers of the name Christ.

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Celebrate our Blessed Mother who never tires of interceding on our behalf.

Ash Wednesday
Throughout these 40 days we allow our pride to fade into humility as together we ask for forgiveness.

Mardi Gras
Promise this Lent to do one thing to become more aware of God in yourself and in others.

St. Josephine Bakhita
Today we honor the first saint from the Sudan, who was a model of piety and humility.

National Marriage Week
During this week especially tell each other how much your marriage means to you.




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