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Franciscan Media Books
an imprint of Franciscan Media


Should Franciscan Media Publish Your Book?

Our Mission

Franciscan Media seeks to spread the Word that is Jesus Christ in the style of Sts. Francis, Clare, and Anthony. Through print and electronic media marketed in North America and worldwide, we endeavor to evangelize, inspire, and inform those who search for God and seek a richer Catholic, Christian, human life. Our efforts help support the life, ministry, and charities of the Franciscan Friars of St. John the Baptist Province, who sponsor our work.

What We Seek to Publish

Franciscan Media Books seeks manuscripts that inform and inspire adult Catholics, other Christians and all who are seeking to better understand and live their faith . We publish for those who want to connect to the world around them in the context of their faith and their spiritual journey. Our goal is to help people "Live in love. Grow in faith."

We look for writing that speaks to a popular audience and is not academic or scholarly in tone. Writing should be easy to read, practical, concrete, and may include relatable examples and stories. Our books strive to support the spread of the Gospel in the spirit of St. Francis, without being moralistic or overly reliant on jargon, but by reaching out and touching the heart.

We publish a total of 20 to 30 trade non-fiction and fiction books per year.

What We Do Not Publish

We do not publish poetry; collections of homilies or essays or columns; academic studies; art books; or encyclopedias.

Our Market: Who Buys Our Books

The people who buy our trade books are Catholics, other Christians and seekers/searchers who value the breadth and intellectually stimulating message rooted in the Gospel of Jesus Christ and, in a general sense, reflect the spirit of St. Francis, a spirit of inclusion, of respect for all faiths and traditions, of respect for the created order.

How to Submit Your Book Proposal

When you are ready to submit a complete book proposal, you can submit it by e-mail (preferred) or by postal delivery:

E-mail to MLombard@FranciscanMedia.org

Postal delivery to:

Mark Lombard
Director, Book Publishing Division and Foreign Rights
Franciscan Media
28 W. Liberty St.
Cincinnati, OH 45202

Your book proposal should include:
  • A cover letter that tells us what you are proposing—the subject of the book, its approximate word count, the intended audience, what makes your idea distinct from similar books on the market, a summary of competitive books.
  • A table of contents.
  • A detailed outline or synopsis of the book, chapter by chapter.
  • A sample chapter and the introduction.
  • A résumé, curriculum vitae, or brief biographical information pertinent to your writing, publishing, or speaking endeavors.
  • A description of your platform (other books published and information about their sales, speaking engagements, social media presene, blog, and other writing outlets).
  • Any endorsements for your book or proposal you have secured or expect to be able to secure.
  • Your ideas for promotion and marketing of the book and how you will be an active publishing partner in marketing your book.
  • Your Address, e-mail, and telephone number.
Upon receipt of your proposal, we will send you a response within 60 days for proposals sent by e-mail, 90 days for those sent by postal delivery.

We do not accept proposals submitted to another publisher at the same time.

We prefer proposals that have not been submitted to another publisher at the same time.

We do not accept responsibility for lost manuscripts or unsolicited material, and do not return unsolicited manuscripts or books.

Thank you for your interest in Franciscan Media Books and Franciscan Media.

Rev. 6/15





Augustine of Canterbury: In the year 596, some 40 monks set out from Rome to evangelize the Anglo-Saxons in England. Leading the group was Augustine, the prior of their monastery in Rome. Hardly had he and his men reached Gaul (France) when they heard stories of the ferocity of the Anglo-Saxons and of the treacherous waters of the English Channel. Augustine returned to Rome and to the pope who had sent them—St. Gregory the Great (September 3 )—only to be assured by him that their fears were groundless. 
<p>Augustine again set out. This time the group crossed the English Channel and landed in the territory of Kent, ruled by King Ethelbert, a pagan married to a Christian, Bertha. Ethelbert received them kindly, set up a residence for them in Canterbury and within the year, on Pentecost Sunday, 597, was himself baptized. After being consecrated a bishop in France, Augustine returned to Canterbury, where he founded his see. He constructed a church and monastery near where the present cathedral, begun in 1070, now stands. As the faith spread, additional sees were established at London and Rochester. </p><p>Work was sometimes slow and Augustine did not always meet with success. Attempts to reconcile the Anglo-Saxon Christians with the original Briton Christians (who had been driven into western England by Anglo-Saxon invaders) ended in dismal failure. Augustine failed to convince the Britons to give up certain Celtic customs at variance with Rome and to forget their bitterness, helping him evangelize their Anglo-Saxon conquerors </p><p>Laboring patiently, Augustine wisely heeded the missionary principles—quite enlightened for the times—suggested by Pope Gregory the Great: purify rather than destroy pagan temples and customs; let pagan rites and festivals be transformed into Christian feasts; retain local customs as far as possible. The limited success Augustine achieved in England before his death in 605, a short eight years after he arrived in England, would eventually bear fruit long after in the conversion of England. Augustine of Canterbury can truly be called the “Apostle of England.”</p> American Catholic Blog A hero isn’t someone born with unconquerable strength and selflessness. Heroes are not formed in a cataclysmic instant. Heroism is developed over time, one decision after another, moment by moment, formed by a deliberate, chosen, and habitual response to life.

Proclaiming the Gospel of Life by Fr. Frank Pavone

 
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Ven. Pierre Toussaint
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Memorial Day (U.S.)
This weekend remember all those who have fought and died for peace.

Sacrament of the Eucharist
When you are with the bread of life, you don't have to go out and look for food. You already have it in abundance.

Caregiver
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Praying for You
Let your pastor know that you prayed for him today, or that you will pray for him tomorrow.




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